chopandquench.typepad.com > O'Day Tempest

A. Tempest in original condition

A. Tempest in original condition

Lots of grunge. Bottom hasn't been powerwashed in a couple of years. However, underneath all that filth is quite decent antifouling.


B. Another shot of the boat as it was

B. Another shot of the boat as it was


C. Closeup of waterline muck

C. Closeup of waterline muck

I used oven cleaner above the antifouling to remove the baked-on filth. Quite effective.


D. closeup of keel grunge

D. closeup of keel grunge

This came off easily thanks to decent antifouling underneath


E. Peeling paint on the cabin ceiling

E. Peeling paint on the cabin ceiling

I ground all the paint off with a wire brush attachment on my grinder.


F. More cabin filth

F. More cabin filth


G. Delamination of the underside of foredeck

G. Delamination of the underside of foredeck

Very nasty. I pulled some of this off and the balsa core was sopping wet and completely rotton. Foredeck will need to be rebuilt.


H. Hull clean

H. Hull clean

The hull cleaned up nicely. Slapped some antifouling on the bottom and the boat was launched on May 7. The hull itself turned out to be in pretty good shape.


I. Shot of the skeg and rudder

I. Shot of the skeg and rudder


J. The Tempest flies!

J. The Tempest flies!


K_foredeck_underside

K_foredeck_underside

This triangular thing is the bottom of the fiberglass and balsa sandwich that the foredeck was composed of. The dark brown stuff is rotten balsa. I cut the fiberglass bottom panel out using a grinder with a cutting disk attachment. The balsa was sopping wet and rotten. It just fell out in chunks after I removed the bottom of the sandwich.

I've since confirmed that in all the places that use balsa core the balsa is wet and rotten, mostly due to badly bedded deck hardware that allows the water to enter the core freely. This includes most of the cabin top and side decks.

Everywhere where solid fiberglass was used is in very good shape.


L_corecell_foredeck

L_corecell_foredeck

I replaced the rotton balsa in the foredeck with Core-cell, a closed cell foam board material that you can see in the picture. The core-cell is glued to the fiberglass deck (top layer) with thickened epoxy. It was hard to enough pressure to clamp the core-cell to the deck above. The picture shows some wooden battens that I sprung against the core-cell to push it against the deck. This was only partially successful. If I had to do it again I would drill holes right through the deck and use bolts to clamp the core-cell to the deck above until the epoxy dries.


M_battens

M_battens

Here's another section of the foredeck with core-cell being battened agains the deck above.

I later laid up two layers of 6 oz fiberglass cloth against the core-cell to form the bottom part of the the new foredeck sandwich. I held the cloth in place using SS staples before laying on the resin.

This was a rather dirty and unpleasant job, but isn't too hard as long as you don't let the resin thicken while you are rolling it on. I used a 3 inch roller to do the job. The first layer of cloth was done in hot weather and the first batch of epoxy started to go off when I was only half done. Then it started pulling the fiberglass cloth off the core-cell as I tried to roll it on. From then on I mixed small batches so it would not go off while I worked.